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You are on a roll...3 days in a row of intense workouts!!! That muscle soreness and stiffness is really adding up. How about some extra time dedicated to warming up and stretching before the next workout? Not so fast! Maybe you may be better served with a nice cold Whole Body Cryotherapy session instead. Now don't get us wrong...Stretching is fantastic! Opening up tight areas of the body are so important to develop proper movement patterns and improve our range of motion. However, your pre workout/exercise related activity may be hindering your performance in the gym.

As it turns out, static stretching may be reducing your body's ability to hit that PR(personal record) on your one rep max squat, or other compound movement. Recent studies conclude that PSS(Passive Static Stretching) actually reduces strength output and may increase joint instability when done prior to exercise activity(Gergeley,2013).

You have probably heard it from us before if you visit regularly. Many times, we actually recommend that you do your Cryotherapy prior to that workout. While this is still seemingly counterintuitive to many who think we are crazy to suggest getting cold prior to exercise, it actually may be better for you than that old stretching routine you do. WBC(Whole Body Cryotherapy) stimulates the same vascular response as actual cold water(ice) therapy with one MAJOR difference. WBC does not freeze the underlying muscle tissue during your 3 minute max exposure period. You get all the benefits from the physiological response of cold exposure; endorphins, metabolic increase and pain relief and you can work out immediately afterwards. "Recent studies show the anti-inflammatory, anti-analgesic, and anti-oxidant effects of this therapy by highlighting the underlying physiological responses. In addition to its therapeutic effects, whole-body cryotherapy has been demonstrated to be a preventive strategy against the deleterious effects of exercise-induced inflammation and soreness"(Lombardi, Ziemann, & Banfi 2017).

Bottom line...save the mobility and stretching for your recovery days...Harness the power of cold before your workout.

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Light Up Your Life: A Conservative Approach to Dealing with Depression

We all know someone suffering from depression. Many of us have experienced it ourselves and understand how greatly it impacts every aspect of life. According to the most recent statistics presented by the CDC, antidepressants are the third most commonly prescribed drug in the United States. But what if we can be taking a more conservative approach?

Preliminary research on photobiomodulation (PBM) shows promising results in the treatment of depression. PBM is a type of low-level laser therapy that delivers light waves to the body. When administered transcranially, there is scientific evidence that depression symptoms may be significantly reduced. One study showed good ...

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Hormones, we all have them. Early on in our pubescent years, it is probably safe to say we just wanted them to go away. As we grow older, that wish is slowly but surely granted. Weight gain, sleep issues, metabolic conditions, poor performance in the gym and in the sack leaves us wishing they would return to previous levels. Enter modern medicine and technology; hormonal therapy, supplementation and a rapidly growing and expanding Anti-aging movement driven by demographics largely thanks to all the amazing baby boomers. Why not try cryotherapy?

Since the days of gladiators to today’s olympians, human kind has been trying to explore the prospects of increased performance to top the pinnacle of human capabilities. It has led to the c...

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The World Health Organization estimates that 350 million people are affected by depression. The National Institute of Mental Health estimates that 18% of the US adult population is affected by an anxiety disorder of some kind. That is an enormous number, one that does not even begin to bring light to how difficult it can be to try and live life when dealing with anyone of these conditions. The stigma, the treatment resistance, the “wise words” of people who tell you, “you just have to want to be happy” or to “chill out.”

What if “chilling out” brought new meaning to the way one might approach mental health? After a 15 visit whole body cryotherapy trial, an experimental group had reporting i...

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Twenty of anything seems to be a great number. Andrew Jackson’s face tends to be a pretty site when receiving a bill (although Benjamin Franklin would be nice too) or the feeling of finally leaving your teens behind you. Who would have thought that it also happens to be the most therapeutic amount of consistent daily whole body cryotherapy sessions?

Lubkowska et. Al (2011) conducted a small study showing that 20 sessions of cryotherapy caused blood level changes in pro and anti-inflammatory markers. Specifically, the changes were an increase in anti-inflammatory markers and decrease in pro-inflammatory markers. Lubkowska et. Al (2011) explains that the specific anti-inflammatory marker (IL-6) had marked increases because of its rol...

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Humans are an amazing species; we have never been the strongest, fastest, we don’t make poison or fly. Despite this, human species’ best quality is our adaptability. The human body is in a constant balance of receiving information from the outside and sending a response outwards. The moment you step into GLACÉ CRYOTHERAPY’s chambers, it’s no different. Your body is forced to adapt.

The intense cold forces your body to respond by shunting the blood from the skin back to the organs via vasoconstriction, the closing down of the small blood vessels that lie in the skin. Dana (1969) reported a response to cold that quickly follows the vasoconstriction, which is a reactive opening of blood vessels or vasodilation...

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As most people know, when you get cold, you shiver. The shiver response is characterized as an increase in heat production via the contraction of skeletal muscles. This can increase to a level that is 500% more than resting metabolic rate (Jansky, 1998). If you haven’t been into the chambers at GLACÉ San Jose or Los Gatos, ask anyone who has: you shiver. You shiver hard. This means that every time you shiver, your body is using an increased caloric consumption just to maintain your body heat for survival.Interestingly, there is another mechanism for heat production in the body: non-shivering thermogenesis. This is primarily down through the use of brown adipose tissue (BAT) that is often found in higher amounts in hibernatin...

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